The Alphabet Song Does Not Need to Change

Marandah Mangra-Dutcher, Copy Editor

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Everyone who has grown up in the United States knows the Alphabet Song. It is one of the first things taught to a child in kindergarten, and many people whether you are 16 or 50, still use it today.

However, Twitter was in pure outrage this week because someone found a different version of the Alphabet song. The song slows down the speed of L-M-N-O-P instead of the well-known elemenopee lagato, wording. The change in the song angered enough people for the event to make itself a “Twitter Moment,” which means it was trending in the United States. Among these Tweets, people were stating that the letters, when slowed down, would clarify the confusion some people felt when they get to those specific letters.

This version of the song was originally created in 2012 but when a known comedian, Noah Garfinkel, shared it on Twitter, the song gained new found life. The rage the internet felt fueled conversation and has since reached national news outlets like the Today Show and The New York Times.

I would like state, that there is nothing wrong with the Alphabet song. Everyone in past generations has grown up with the original song and the world has not fallen apart. We are still standing. We know how to read and write. Why change it now?

This falls into the on-going argument about how as generations continue parents and adults are making life too easy on children. The song does not need to change, I understand it might be hard to learn at first. However, everyone who learned it the original way is fine. We are fine. Just because some kids might be struggling with the song, does not mean we need to change it just to benefit them. They will figure it out. A little hardship makes better character, some would say.

Do not submit to the new Alphabet song. Stick with what you know and teach the next generation the original. Kids do not need to have everything given to them, and eventually they need to learn how to cope and learn themselves.

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